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Archives - Patient Dumping

In each CMP case resolved through a settlement agreement, the settling party has contested the OIG's allegations and denied any liability. No CMP judgment or finding of liability has been made against the settling party.

2007

12-12-2007
Madison County Memorial Hospital (MCMH), a small hospital in Florida, agreed to pay $5,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide an appropriate medical screening to an adult male who presented to its emergency department, accompanied by his wife, with complaints of nausea and vomiting.
11-29-2007
Brackenridge Hospital (Brackenridge), Texas, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide stabilizing treatment to an adult male who presented to its emergency department (ED) with complaints of having a severe headache for four days. A CT scan revealed a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brackenridge's ED physician determined that the patient needed to be seen by a neurosurgeon. The ED physician called its on-call neurosurgeon. The on-call neurosurgeon refused to go to the ED to examine or treat the patient, stating that she would only see pediatric patients. The patient was transferred to a hospital nearly 66 miles away and was hospitalized for three days.
07-30-2007
Regional Medical Center of San Jose (RMC), California, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide stabilizing treatment within the capabilities of its staff and facilities and improperly transferred a critically injured two-year-old child that presented to its emergency department (ED) after being struck by a car.
07-10-2007
Wheaton Franciscan Healthcare - St. Joseph, Inc. f/k/a St. Joseph Regional Medical Center (St. Joseph), Wisconsin, agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to a woman that presented to St. Joseph's emergency department (ED) complaining of severe upper quadrant abdominal, hip, and thigh pain, following a motor vehicle accident. The ED physician diagnosed the patient as having a right hip and thigh contusion and did not conduct any lab work, x-rays, or a CT scan. The patient was given an anti-inflammatory and discharged. The patient protested leaving the ED, informed a nurse that she was in extreme pain and could not walk. Hospital staff told the patient to leave the hospital and threatened to call the police. The patient was then placed in a wheelchair and escorted to her relative's car by hospital security. The patient presented to another hospital's ED where an x-ray revealed that she had a dislocated right hip and a CT scan of the hip revealed an acetabular fracture that prevented relocation of the hip without surgery.
06-27-2007
Homestead Hospital, Inc. (HHI), Florida, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a patient who was 41 weeks pregnant with regular contractions. HHI allegedly asked the patient if she had Medicaid or any other type of health insurance. After the patient advised that she did not have insurance, HHI's staff directed her to another hospital.
06-13-2007
University of California, San Diego – La Jolla (UCSD) agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination for a 21 year-old woman that presented to UCSD's emergency department (ED) complaining of vaginal and rectal pain after being raped. An ED nurse directed the patient to a hospital with a sexual assault response team (equipped to collect forensic evidence) without first providing any medical evaluation or treatment of her medical condition.
06-06-2007
Intermountain Healthcare d/b/a American Fork Hospital (AFH), a small hospital in Utah, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve two allegations of patient dumping. In the first incident, the OIG alleged that AFH failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a 15-year-old girl that presented to AFH's emergency department (ED) complaining of severe abdominal pain and nausea. She was seen in the ED the day before and returned in a worsened condition. Before evaluating the condition of the patient, the hospital told the patient's father that his co-pay would be 70% versus the 10% he was charged the previous day. The father took his daughter to another hospital where she was given morphine and phenegran and underwent surgery the next day.
In the second incident, a 73-year-old resident at an assisted living center presented to AFH's ED by ambulance with complaints of difficulty breathing. The OIG alleged that AFH failed to provide the patient with an appropriate medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment before transferring her to another hospital. The patient had high blood pressure, a fast pulse rate, and a history of stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and congestive heart failure. While the patient expressed an interest in being treated by her doctors at another hospital, the risks of her being transferred in very serious condition were not discussed with her or her family member. Upon arrival to the next hospital, she was admitted and remained in the hospital's ICU for 9 days.
05-30-2007
Medical Center of Arlington (MCA), Texas, agreed to pay $30,000 to resolve allegations that it violated the screening, stabilization, and transfer provisions of the patient dumping statute when a female in her 39th week of pregnancy presented to MCA's labor and delivery department with contractions. After approximately 35 minutes of observation, an on-duty obstetrician ordered that the patient be discharged with instructions to go straight to another hospital that was nearly 21 miles away. The patient traveled with her husband by private automobile and upon arrival, the patient was almost fully dilated with bulging membranes.
05-24-2007
Park Plaza Hospital of Houston, Texas (Park Plaza) agreed to pay $11,250 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to an obese man who presented to Park Plaza's emergency department via ambulance for examination and treatment of a leg ulcer and low blood pressure. A staff nurse erroneously told the ambulance personnel that the hospital could not treat the patient due to his weight.
05-22-2007
Western Plains Medical Complex (Western), a small hospital in Kansas, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment or an appropriate transfer to a 16-year-old female who presented to its emergency department seeking treatment for seizures. A nurse instructed the family to take their daughter to a hospital three hours away where her doctor practiced. Upon arrival to the hospital, the patient was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit.
04-30-2007
St. Mary's Medical Center (St. Mary's), Indiana, agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide stabilizing treatment to an uninsured male that presented to St. Mary's emergency department (ED) in an unresponsive state. A CT scan revealed a subarachnoid intraventricular hemorrhage, an extremely acute neurological condition. St. Mary's ED physician determined that the patient needed to be seen by a neurosurgeon. The ED physician called its on-call neurosurgeon. The on-call neurosurgeon was in the hospital, but he refused to go to the ED to examine or treat the patient. Instead, he directed the ED physician to transfer the patient to another hospital that was located approximately 183 miles away. Before transfer, the neurosurgeon at the receiving hospital informed St. Mary's that the patient needed a ventricular shunt as soon as possible to divert the flow of excess fluid and relieve the pressure on the brain. St. Mary's did not have their neurosurgeon install the shunt; instead they transferred the patient to the other hospital without providing any further screening or treatment. Upon the patient's arrival at the other hospital, he was brain dead.
04-20-2007
San Francisco General Hospital, California, admitted to liability and agreed to pay $5,000 to resolve allegations that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to an individual who presented to its emergency department in emotional distress
03-27-2007
Freeman Health System East/West (Freeman), Missouri, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide a medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment for a patient who was brought to Freeman's psychiatric unit by his parents. The patient was a young adult with a history of schizophrenia. His psychiatrist had made arrangements for the patient to be treated and hospitalized at Freeman. While waiting to be screened, he was placed unaccompanied in an assessment room. Later he walked out of the room and struck a male staff member. He was then placed in a seclusion room and, without any assessment or treatment, was taken to jail where he was held overnight.
03-02-2007
Fort Duncan Medical Center (Ft. Duncan), a small hospital in Texas, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide a patient with treatment within its capability and capacity to stabilize her emergency medical condition and inappropriately transferred the patient to another hospital in Mexico where she died. The patient had recently suffered a stroke and complained of decreased mental status and a headache.

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2006

12-20-2006
After it self-disclosed conduct to the OIG, Murray-Calloway County Public Hospital Corporation d/b/a Murray-Calloway County Hospital (MCCH), Kentucky, agreed to pay $175,000 and enter into a 3-year corporate integrity agreement for allegedly violating the Civil Monetary Penalties Law. The OIG alleged that MCCH: (1) leased space in its medical office building to physician tenants at rental rates below fair market value, and entered into such lease arrangements without written agreements; (2) entered into global billing arrangements with certain physicians without written agreements; (3) entered into Medical Directorship arrangements with certain physicians for oversight of hospital-wide operations, the vascular lab, and long-term care operations without written agreements; entered into cooperative marketing arrangements with certain physicians; and (5) failed to bill a certain physician independent practice association (IPA) for the employment benefits provided to an employee of MCCH assigned to the IPA.
09-06-2006
Hospital Hermanos Melendez, Puerto Rico, agreed to pay $30,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and/or stabilizing treatment to two individuals who presented to its emergency department. The first case involved a 2-month-old infant that was born prematurely and had recently left a pediatric intensive care unit. The infant presented with anemia and symptoms of Bronchitis. The second individual, a 3-year-old child, presented with complaints of vomiting after falling from a bed.
07-10-2006
Citizens Memorial Hospital (CMH), Missouri, agreed to pay $75,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that CMH failed to provide appropriate medical screening examinations to three patients who went to CMH's emergency department (ED) with various medical conditions, including a baby with life-threatening acute bronchitis and exacerbated asthma, a woman whose intestines were protruding from a loose C-section incision, and a teenage boy who complained that he could not move, stand, walk, or feel his limbs.
06-12-2006
Cedars Medical Center (CMC), Florida, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that CMC failed to provide appropriate medical screening examinations and/or stabilizing treatment for two patients who went to CMC's emergency department (ED). The mother was allegedly informed that CMC did not treat pediatric patients and that she would have to take her daughter to another facility. The daughter, who was pregnant, presented to another facility with lower abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. She was stabilized and transported to another hospital. The second patient presented to CMC's ED accompanied by fire rescue workers, the police, and his grandmother. The patient was threatening to burn himself. A psychiatric nurse allegedly suggested that the patient be taken to another hospital across the street, where beds were readily available, in order to avoid a long wait in the ED. The patient was taken to the other hospital where he was admitted.
05-16-2006
Valley Health System d/b/a Hemet Valley Medical Center (HVMC), California, agreed to pay $45,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute in two separate incidents. In the first incident, the OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a pregnant patient that presented to its emergency department with complaints of pain and blood in her urine. In the second incident, the OIG alleged that HVMC failed to stabilize a pregnant patient before discharging her. The patient presented to HVMC with complaints of contractions and decreased fetal movement. The patient was allegedly informed by HVMC that her fetus had died. She was not stabilized prior to discharge, nor was she transferred to another medical facility.
05-08-2006
The University of Chicago Hospitals (UCH), Illinois, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to accept an appropriate transfer of a 61-year-old male who presented to another emergency department with a complaint of flank pain. UCH had specialized capabilities not available at the transferring hospital and allegedly refused to accept transfer after learning that the patient did not have insurance. UCH then later agreed to accept transfer of the patient only if he provided proof of funds in a bank account. The patient was transferred to another hospital where he died.
04-26, 2006
New York City Health & Hospitals Corporation on behalf of Queens Hospital Center (QHC), New York, agreed to pay $75,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that QHC failed to provide appropriate medical screening examinations to two patients who went to QHC's emergency department (ED). One patient, a nine-year-old girl, went to the ED with complaints of fainting, vomiting, and headaches. She was given a cursory exam by an ED physician, but died of a brain tumor while still in the ED waiting for a screening exam. The other patient arrived in an ambulance with an abnormal EKG reading and died of a heart attack in the ED after an hour without receiving a screening exam.
04-20-2006
Poudre Valley Health System, d/b/a Poudre Valley Hospital (PVH), agreed to pay $55,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that PVH failed to transport to its emergency department (ED) and failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a deaf, nonverbal, and developmentally disabled male. The patient went to a neighbor's house in distress and complained that he did not feel well. The neighbor called for an ambulance. The ambulance that responded was owned by PVH. The patient allegedly complained to the paramedics about stomach pain and discomfort by writing notes and constantly motioning to his stomach. The paramedics checked his temperature, lung signs, and blood sugar but refused to transport him to PVH's ED. Instead, a friend took the man by private vehicle to PVH's ED. At the ED, the man's friend told a clerk that the man was complaining of stomach pain. A nurse allegedly reported that the man had already been to the ED three times and that he was only hungry and that he should not be admitted. A social worker allegedly gave him crackers and called for a taxicab to take him home. Two days later, the man died at home of hypovolemic shock caused by gastritis with erosion, ulcers, and gastric hemorrhage.
03-24-2006
E.A. Conway Medical Center, Louisiana, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Conway failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a patient who was suffering from an acute psychotic episode. The patient was brought to Conway after being apprehended by local police officers.
03-15-2006
Sacred Heart Hospital, Florida, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a pregnant minor who presented to its emergency department with complaints of stomach pain and pressure, and blood in her urine. The hospital refused to treat the patient without parental consent.
02-27-2006
Memorial Hospital and Health Care Center (Memorial), Indiana, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a two-year-old boy who presented with his grandmother to Memorial's emergency department after squirting bug spray in his eyes. After discovering that the boy had coverage under Medicaid, a registration clerk allegedly informed the boy's grandmother that Memorial did not accept Medicaid and that she would have to take the boy to another hospital.
02-17-2006
A Texas physician agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve his liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the on-call physician failed to respond to a request to come to the emergency department to treat a pregnant female who presented to the labor and delivery department with symptoms of pre-eclampsia and pulmonary edema. The patient was transferred to another facility that had an obstetrician on-site.
01-18-2006
Poplar Bluff Regional Medical Center f/k/a Three Rivers Healthcare (TRH), Missouri, agreed to pay $60,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that TRH failed to provide appropriate medical screenings and/or stabilizing treatments for several patients who came to TRH's emergency department with various medical conditions, including head trauma, acute alcoholism, pellet wounds, and suicidal ideation.

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2005

12-23-2005
Queen of the Valley Hospital, California, agreed to pay $80,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute arising out of two incidents. The OIG alleged that the hospital refused to accept the transfer of a critical patient to its intensive care unit and failed to provide an appropriate medical screening exam to a pregnant patient who presented to the hospital's maternity ward.
12-06-2005
Methodist Healthcare System of San Antonio, Ltd., LLP, d/b/a Metropolitan Methodist Hospital (MMH), Texas, agreed to pay $12,500 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that MMH failed to provide a medical screening examination to a patient who suffered a syncopal episode in an ambulance located on the property of MMH (based on MMH's assertion that the ED was on diversion). The ambulance transported the patient to another hospital where she was treated and released.
12-05-2005
Kaiser Foundation Hospital, California, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a 53-year-old man who presented to its emergency department after being in a motorcycle accident. The patient returned to the ED the following day, was admitted and treated.
11-03-2005
Cordell Memorial Hospital, a small hospital in Oklahoma, agreed to pay $7,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide appropriate medical screening examinations for three patients who presented to its emergency department.
11-02-2005
Pekin Memorial Hospital, Illinois, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide appropriate medical screening examinations in two separate incidents to patients who presented to its hospital. The first incident involved a patient in her 37 th week of pregnancy who arrived at Pekin to be evaluated before going to the hospital where she planned to deliver. Pekin staff allegedly informed her that since she was not registered at Pekin and her physician did not have privileges at Pekin, she should go on to the other hospital. The second incident involved a 16-year-old male presenting to Pekin's adolescent chemical dependency unit. The patient exhibited symptoms of chemical dependency and mental illness, including disorientation, diminished responsiveness, auditory hallucinations and suicidal ideations. Pekin allegedly referred the patient to another hospital without providing an appropriate medical screening examination.
10-13-2005
Clark Memorial Hospital, Indiana, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide two patients with sufficient medical screening examinations to determine if the patients had emergency medical conditions. The first incident involved a patient presenting to the emergency department (ED) with complaints of not having slept for three days. The second incident involved a patient presenting to the ED with complaints of hearing voices, believing people were following her, and having mood swings from depression to elation. The OIG alleged that neither patient was adequately evaluated given their symptoms and complaints and neither was evaluated by a physician.
10-03-2005
Mease Countryside Hospital, Florida, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Mease failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to an 81-year-old male with a history of heart disease who presented to Mease's emergency department via ambulance with complaints of nausea and shortness of breath. The OIG further alleged that Mease directed the ambulance attendants to place the patient in the hallway. The patient did not receive any medical attention for approximately 40 minutes and left the hospital against medical advice.
08-12-2005
Paradise Valley Hospital, California, agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that on five separate occasions, the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to five patients. Four of the alleged violations involved patients who left the hospital's emergency department (ED) after waiting three or more hours and without being seen. The fifth alleged violation involved a 37-year-old male who presented to the hospital's ED with a chief complaint of suicidal ideation. The hospital allegedly refused requests from the patient and police to admit the patient, and refused police requests to arrange a transfer of the patient to another facility. Ultimately, the police transported the patient to another hospital.
07-22-2005
Hickman Community Hospital, a small hospital in Tennessee, agreed to pay $5,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide appropriate medical screening examinations for two patients that presented to its emergency department.
07-14-2005
Lakeside Hospital, Louisiana, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination for two patients that presented to its emergency department (ED). The first incident involved a 64-year-old woman who presented to the hospital's ED via ambulance with a complaint of being raped and experiencing chest pains. A nurse on duty allegedly directed the EMS attendant to take the patient to another facility. The second incident involved a two-month-old infant that presented to Lakeside's Urgent Care Center for evaluation of its breathing and breathing apparatus. A physician on duty allegedly directed the parents to take the child to another facility without performing a medical screening examination.
05-24-2005
Florida Hospital Heartland, Florida, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a 21-year-old woman who presented to its emergency department (ED) three times over a 12-day period complaining of head pain. On the first visit, the hospital did provide an appropriate medical screening examination and proper testing that concluded that the patient had meningitis and communicating hydrocephalus. The OIG alleged that during the second and third visits, the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination or treatment given the patient's worsening condition. The patient died two days after her last visit to the hospital's ED. An autopsy revealed that the patient died of a rare parasitic infection.
05-18-2005
Wilson Medical Center, North Carolina, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide appropriate medical screening examinations and treatment for three patients that presented to its emergency department between January 31, 2001 and May 20, 2001.
05-16-2005
Bessemer Carraway Medical Center - University of Alabama Medical West, Alabama, agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Bessemer failed to provide a complete medical screening examination for a female patient who presented to Bessemer's emergency department complaining of a fever and chills related to a kidney infection that had lasted for four days. The patient was seen by the triage nurse who took her vital signs and allegedly concluded that the patient would be classified as non-urgent. The triage nurse allegedly instructed the patient to go to the registration desk to pay $85. The patient left the hospital and went to another hospital where she was admitted and treated with IV antibiotics.
04-05-2005
Proctor Hospital, Illinois, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment, or an appropriate transfer for an infant that presented to its emergency department with altered and decreased levels of consciousness and seizure-like activity.
03-23-2005
St. Joseph Hospital, California, agreed to pay $30,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and treatment to stabilize the emergency medical condition of a 15-year-old girl who presented to their emergency department, via ambulance, after overdosing on methadone. The hospital allegedly treated the girl with a narcotic antagonist and discharged her three hours later. After returning home, the patient died from aspiration of gastric content due to methadone intoxication.
03-23-2005
Caritas Norwood Hospital, Massachusetts, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to an elderly male who presented to its emergency department (ED) via ambulance with complaints of hypertension and an altered mental state. The emergency service personnel (EMS) contacted the hospital and were allegedly informed by a nurse that the hospital was on diversion status. The EMS decided to take the man to the hospital's ED anyway and again were allegedly informed by another nurse that the hospital was on diversion and that they could not take the patient.
03-18-2005
St. James Psychiatric Hospital, Inc., Louisiana, agreed to pay $30,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to accept appropriate transfers of two patients with psychiatric emergencies who needed the specialized capabilities of the hospital.
03-18-2005
Hospital San Francisco, Puerto Rico, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a 3-year-old boy who presented to its emergency department. The boy did not have health insurance and the OIG alleged that the admissions department requested that his mother pay a private deposit of $2,150. The mother took her soon to another hospital where he was hospitalized for four days and treated for right bronchopneumonia and maxillary sinusitis.
03-17-2005
Midwestern Regional Medical Center (Midwestern), a small hospital in Illinois, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Midwestern failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a pregnant woman who presented to its emergency department complaining of vaginal bleeding and passing blood clots. Midwestern allegedly asked the patient whether she had insurance and she stated that she did not. Without providing any further medical screening, Midwestern allegedly discharged the patient a few minutes later.
01-06-2005
Dameron Hospital Association (Dameron), California, agreed to pay $75,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Dameron failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to 16 individuals that presented to its emergency department. The individuals presented with a variety of complaints, including, chest pain, abdominal pain, vaginal bleeding, fever, vomiting, dizziness, and coughing. The individuals were triaged by a nurse and then asked to wait in he waiting area. After waiting between three and six hours, the individuals left the hospital without receiving an appropriate medical screening examinations.

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2004

12-13-2004
Borgess Lee Memorial Hospital, a small Michigan hospital, agreed to pay $5,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide stabilizing treatment and an appropriate transfer of a 74-year-old male who presented to the hospital's emergency department with complaints of chest pains.
12-01-2004
Baptist Medical Center South (BMCS), Alabama, agreed to pay $45,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Baptist failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to a 71-year-old Medicaid patient who presented to BMCS's emergency department via ambulance with complaints of pain after having tripped and fallen on her knee. BMCS took the patient's vital signs and an x-ray of her knee and gave her 4 mg of Morphine and discharged her. While still on BMCS's property, the patient allegedly became very ill and returned to the emergency department. The OIG alleged that instead of reevaluating the patient, BCMS simply gave her a bedpan and again discharged her to her home. After experiencing a decreased level of consciousness at home, she returned back to BMCS via ambulance in respiratory distress and died a short time later.
11-12-2004
Bothwell Regional Health Center (BRHC), Missouri, agreed to pay $22,500 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that BRHC failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination or an appropriate transfer to a male that was experiencing a severe psychotic episode who was presented involuntarily by a deputy sheriff to BRHC's emergency department. The deputy requested assistance for the patient and an involuntary 96-hour hold. An ED nurse, after allegedly consulting with supervisors, informed the deputy that the Hospital did not take involuntary holds and offered no further assistance. For the next two hours, the patient waited in the ED while the deputy made arrangements to take him to another hospital 90 miles away where the patient was admitted and treated.
11-12-2004
Kaiser Foundation Hospital (KFH), California, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that KFH failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a pregnant woman who presented to KFH's emergency department (ED) with complaints of abdominal and back pains. The patient was allegedly instructed by a labor and delivery nurse to go to the hospital where her physician had privileges. The patient left the hospital without being evaluated.
09-27-2004
Alamance Regional Medical Center (ARMC), North Carolina, agreed to pay $45,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that ARMC failed to provide appropriate stabilizing treatment or an appropriate transfer to a man who presented involuntarily via ambulance to ARMC's emergency department. After some evaluation and treatment, the patient was transferred to a psychiatric hospital with minimal medical capabilities. At the time of transfer, the patient had a life-threatening sodium level. The psychiatric hospital transferred the patient to another facility for treatment of hyponatremia and hepatic failure.
08-30-2004
Oakdale Community Hospital, a small Louisiana hospital, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening exam and stabilizing treatment to a pregnant 17-year-old female who presented to the hospital's emergency department (ED) with complaints of perineal numbness and vaginal bleeding. A physician refused to treat her due to his erroneous belief that he could not do so absent parental consent.
07-26-2004
Redbud Community Hospital (Redbud), a small California hospital, agreed to pay $7,500 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Redbud failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a 47-year-old male who presented to its emergency department via ambulance after a bicycle accident. The patient was diagnosed and treated for a right clavicle fracture and was discharged. After being discharged, the patient allegedly experienced shortness of breath and was transported to another medical facility. At this medical facility, it was discovered that the patient had also suffered from a closed head injury, vertebral fracture, and an intra-abdominal blood clot. The patient was successfully treated at the second facility.
07-06-2004
Kentucky River Medical Center (KRMC), a small Kentucky hospital, agreed to pay $12,500 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that KRMC failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment or an appropriate medical transfer to a nursing home patient who presented to KRMC via ambulance for chest x-rays. The chest x-ray impressions suggested the patient suffered from ‘acute pneumonia.' After being informed of the diagnosis, the nursing home requested that the patient be transferred to KRMC's emergency department (ED) for treatment. Upon presentment to the ED, the ambulance personnel were allegedly told by the director of the ED, that the ED was extremely busy and that the patient could not be seen. The ambulance personnel then returned the patient to the nursing home where she was given antibiotics.
06-28-2004
South Shore Hospital and Medical Center (South Shore), Florida, agreed to pay $12,500 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that South Shore failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a patient who presented to its emergency department, via ambulance, seeking treatment for a severed fingertip sustained during an accident. The OIG further alleged that South Shore personnel instructed the patient to go to another facility.
06-24-2004
Christus Schumpert Health System (Christus), Louisiana, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Christus failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment, or an appropriate medical transfer for two pregnant patients that presented to Christus's emergency department (ED) on separate occasions. The first incident involved a patient who was six months pregnant who presented to Christus's ED with a chief complaint of back pains. Allegedly, a clerk told the patient that there were no beds available and that she would have to go to another hospital to be seen. The second incident involved a patient in active labor who presented herself to Christus's ED requesting medical attention. An admitting clerk allegedly told the patient that there were no services at the facility for delivering babies and that she would have to go to another hospital. The patient was then transported by private car to another hospital. While being transported, the baby's head crowned and the patient delivered in the parking lot in a wheelchair at the other hospital.
06-23-2004
A Louisiana physician agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve his liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the physician failed to provide an appropriate medical screening exam and stabilizing treatment to a pregnant 17-year-old female who presented to the hospital's emergency department (ED) with complaints of perineal numbness and vaginal bleeding. The physician refused to treat her due to his erroneous belief that he could not do so absent parental consent.
06-23-2004
Regions Hospital, Minnesota, agreed to pay $30,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment, or an appropriate medical transfer to an infant who presented to its emergency department vomiting with episodes of bluish skin discoloration. The OIG alleged that the infant's oxygen levels were dropping, his blood pressure was low and he had an elevated respiratory rate. The OIG further alleged that the hospital instructed the infant's mother to take him to another hospital in her own vehicle. When the infant arrived at the other hospital, his skin was allegedly mottled and he was in moderate respiratory distress.
05-25-2004
Good Samaritan Regional Health Center, Illinois, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment, or an appropriate transfer to a patient who presented to its emergency department, via an ambulance, with complaints of rectal bleeding. The OIG further alleged that the emergency medical technicians driving the ambulance were informed by a nurse that the hospital was on diversion status and that they should take the patient to another facility that was located two miles away. Upon arrival at the other facility's emergency department, the patient was diagnosed with having a life-threatening upper gastrointestinal bleed.
05-05-2004
Carthage Area Hospital, a small New York hospital, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment, or an appropriate transfer of a patient who presented to its emergency department with complaints of pain in his chest, neck, back, and shoulder blades, and difficulty breathing as a result of being in an automobile accident. The hospital diagnosed the patient with fractures of the left clavicle and scapula, and discharged him to the care of his family. Allegedly, upon discharge, the patient was carried out of the hospital on a stretcher and assisted into his family's vehicle while still in a great deal of pain. Within one hour of his discharge, the patient was taken by ambulance to a second hospital, where he was found to have fractures of his ribs and back. He was then transferred to a third hospital for surgery.
04-19-2004
Sioux Valley Regional Health Services d/b/a Sioux Valley Canby Campus (Sioux Valley), a small Minnesota hospital, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Sioux Valley failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination of a nine-month-old child who presented to its emergency department at 1:30 a.m. with symptoms of vomiting and high fever. Sioux Valley maintained a practice of locking its doors after 9:00 p.m. for security reasons. For persons seeking access to the hospital after hours, the hospital maintained an intercom system at a side vestibule. The OIG alleged that a nurse informed the parents, via the intercom system, that there was nothing that they could do for the child, as there was no physician on-call. The child was taken to another facility, more than 18 miles away, where he was admitted and treated for pneumonia and dehydration.
04-05-2004
Ottumwa Regional Health Center (Ottumwa), a small Iowa hospital, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Ottumwa failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and treatment to an elderly patient who presented to its emergency department with complaints of severe pain and an inability to urinate. The OIG alleged that Ottumwa advised the patient that it did not have a urologist available and that he would have to go to a neighboring hospital. The patient left and went to a neighboring hospital, where he was given pain relief and sent to surgery within the hour.
03-15-2004
Hanford Community Medical Center (Hanford), a small California hospital, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination of a patient that presented to its emergency department complaining of severe chest pains. The OIG further alleged that Hanford's registration clerk informed the patient that he would have to wait to sign in because the emergency department was crowded. The patient left Hanford to seek treatment at another facility.
03-15-2004
St. Mary's Medical Center (St. Mary's), Indiana, agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve allegations of patient dumping. The OIG alleged that St. Mary's failed to provide needed treatment and inappropriately transferred a 46-year-old uninsured male that presented to their emergency department (ED) by ambulance in an unresponsive state. A CT scan revealed a subarachnoid intraventricular hemorrhage and the on-call neurosurgeon was called. He directed the ED physician to transfer the patient by air to another hospital 183 miles away. That hospital's neurosurgeon told St. Mary's that the patient needed a ventricular shunt to divert the flow of excess fluid and relieve pressure on the brain. St. Mary's did not have their on-call neurosurgeon install the shunt and upon arrival at the receiving hospital, the patient was brain dead.
03-15-2004
St. Mary's Medical Center (SMMC), Florida, agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute for allegedly failing to provide an appropriate medical screening examination of a patient who presented to SMMC's emergency department with symptoms of suicidal thoughts and alcohol abuse. The OIG alleged that SMMC personnel requested the patient's insurance information and told him that without insurance authorization he would be required to pay in advance of receiving services.
02-19-2004
Public Health Trust of Miami-Dade County, Florida d/b/a Jackson Memorial Hospital (Jackson) agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Jackson, which operates a specialized burn center, refused to accept from a referring hospital (which did not have a burn unit) an appropriate transfer of a woman who sustained significant burns to her hands and feet. Jackson allegedly denied the transfer, incorrectly informing the referring hospital that the woman's burns did not meet their burn unit criteria. Jackson also refused to assume financial responsibility for the patient. The woman was airlifted to another Florida hospital with a specialized burn center and treated for her injuries.
02-19-2004
Community Hospital of Los Gatos (Community), California, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination or an appropriate transfer for a 69-year-old man who presented via ambulance to Community's emergency department. The hospital informed EMS that it was on “code yellow” status indicating that the hospital was not available for surgical patients. Instead of providing the patient with an appropriate medical screening examination to determine if he was stable for transfer, the hospital allegedly denied the patient access to the emergency department.
02-13-2004
University of Colorado Hospital Authority (University Hospital), Colorado, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute for allegedly refusing to accept from a referring hospital an appropriate transfer of an individual requiring specialized treatment. The patient presented to the referring hospital by ambulance after having taken an overdose of medication and alcohol in an attempt to commit suicide. After examining and treating the patient to the extent of its capacity, the referring hospital determined that the patient was still suicidal and in need of further psychiatric examination and treatment. The referring hospital attempted to transfer the patient to University Hospital where specialized and inpatient psychiatric services were available. The OIG alleged that upon learning that the patient had no insurance, University Hospital refused to accept the transfer of the patient.

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2003

11-18-2003
Gordon Memorial Hospital, a small hospital in Nebraska, agreed to pay $7,500 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an adequate medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment to three individuals who presented to the hospital for evaluation and treatment.
11-12-2003
SSM DePaul Health Center (SSM), Missouri, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that SSM failed to provide an appropriate medical screening exam and stabilizing treatment to an elderly patient who was transported from a nursing home to the hospital for treatment.
10-31-2003
Mercy San Juan Medical Center, California, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to a woman who was sent to the emergency department by her doctor. The OIG alleged that the hospital discharged her for insurance reasons and sent her to another hospital where she was diagnosed with an emergency medical condition and admitted for treatment.
10-23-2003
SouthPointe Hospital, Missouri, agreed to pay $100,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide appropriate medical screening examinations and/or stabilizing treatment to four individuals who presented to its emergency department. Allegedly one individual presented with a blood alcohol level of .43, another with lacerations on both her wrists, another with high blood pressure and dizziness and another complaining of depression and stating she had been raped.
09-30-2003
St. Joseph's Hospital, a small Indiana hospital, agreed to pay $12,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening exam and stabilizing treatment to a woman who presented to its emergency department via ambulance complaining of hip pain and with a history of hip dislocations. The OIG alleged that a nurse met the ambulance and directed it to another hospital, where the woman was admitted and treated.
09-25-2003
Lackey Memorial Hospital, a small Mississippi hospital, agreed to pay $5,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital did not provide appropriate medical screening examinations to several patients who presented to its emergency department. The OIG further alleged that patients were being asked to pay significant amounts of money before being seen by a doctor to determine if they had an emergency medical condition.
09-25-2003
Public Health Trust of Miami-Dade County d/b/a Jackson Memorial Hospital, Florida, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening exam or stabilizing treatment to two patients who presented to its emergency department. The OIG alleged that one patient, requiring an appendectomy, was inappropriately transferred (possibly due to concerns about insurance), and that another patient who was suicidal did not receive an appropriate screening, treatment, or transfer.
09-25-2003
Midland Memorial Hospital, Texas, agreed to pay $23,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening exam and stabilizing treatment to an 11-year old boy who presented to its emergency department after having been hit in the left eye with a baseball. The OIG alleged that the ED physician contacted the on-call ophthalmologist who told him to discharge the boy and have him go to the ophthalmologist's office the following day. The OIG alleged that instead, the boy's parents drove approximately 150 miles to another hospital where the boy was diagnosed with several conditions and admitted to the hospital for several days.
09-17-2003
Bibb Medical Center (Bibb), a small hospital in Alabama, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Bibb failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a 31-year-old male with cerebral palsy and dementia and who was confined to a wheelchair. The OIG alleged that he presented to the emergency department with his mother, complaining of vomiting and constipation, and an emergency department (ED) physician felt the patient's stomach and informed his mother that there was nothing the ED could do for him that she was not doing at home. The OIG alleged that the patient was taken to another ED and was admitted for several days with the diagnosis of fecal impaction with possible small bowel instruction and right lower lobe pneumonia.
08-25-2003
Falls Community Hospital, a small Texas hospital, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital did not provide an appropriate medical screening exam or stabilizing treatment to a woman who was directed by her doctor to go to the closest emergency room. She allegedly presented with severe abdominal pain and was later diagnosed with acute pancreatitis.
08-18-2003
Johnston Memorial Hospital, Virginia, agreed to pay $5,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital refused to provide an appropriate medical screening exam to a patient presenting to its emergency department doubled over with pain, suffering from acute appendicitis. The OIG alleged further that when the patient's wife was told that the patient would not be seen for one to one-and-a-half hours, she protested without avail and rushed her husband to another hospital, where he received emergency surgery.
08-05-2003
Griffin Memorial Hospital, Oklahoma, agreed to pay $80,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide appropriate medical screening exams to seven individuals who presented to its emergency department with psychiatric complaints. The OIG further alleged that Griffin Memorial Hospital refused to accept an appropriate transfer of a patient with medical and psychiatric problems from another hospital that did not have the specialized capabilities to treat the patient.
07-25-2003
San Antonio State Hospital, Texas, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide stabilizing treatment to a depressed patient who presented to its emergency department after trying to kill herself. Instead, the attending physician allegedly sent the patient, by taxi, to a hospital approximately 17 miles away for treatment of a urinary tract infection. The doctor did so, allegedly, without providing for an appropriate transfer.
06-25-2003
Wayne County Hospital, a small hospital in Iowa, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and treatment and inappropriately transferred a patient who presented to its emergency department complaining of abdominal pain and discharge from the area surrounding a surgical incision. The patient's surgeon allegedly had directed her to go to the emergency department of Wayne County Hospital for evaluation and treatment. The OIG further alleged that the hospital's on-call physician refused to come in and instructed hospital staff to send the patient to the hospital where her surgery had been performed. At the other hospital, she allegedly was diagnosed with a ruptured bowel and was admitted and treated for weeks.
06-23-2003
After it self-disclosed conduct to HHS, John C. Lincoln Hospital – North Mountain, Arizona, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening exam to a pregnant woman with symptoms of pre-eclampsia. A physician allegedly ordered appropriate diagnostic tests which were discontinued by a nurse when she learned of an “insurance denial.” The nurse allegedly then made transfer arrangements, falsely documenting the necessary physician certification for transfer without the approval of the physician. The patient was transported to another hospital via private vehicle.
05-19-2003
The Brown Schools, Inc., former owners of West Oaks Hospital, a psychiatric facility located in Texas, agreed to pay $32,500 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to two patients who presented with psychiatric emergencies (suicidal and/or hallucinating). The OIG alleged that in both cases the hospital directed patients to a county psychiatric facility because the patients lacked insurance. Both patients were admitted for treatment at the other facility.
05-14-2003
Medical Center of Manchester, a small Tennessee hospital, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening exam to a patient who presented to its emergency department with symptoms of head trauma following a go-cart accident by failing to complete a head CT scan that had been ordered and started. The OIG alleged that when the hospital learned that it did not participate in the patient's insurance plan, the mother of the patient was told that she would have to pay a $2,000 deposit for the exam to be completed.
05-02-2003
BHC Fort Lauderdale Hospital, Inc., Florida, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment or an appropriate transfer to two patients who presented to its emergency department displaying signs of a psychiatric emergency. Both patients were transferred via private vehicles (one by taxi) and were admitted at the receiving hospital.
04-25-2003
Marymount Medical Center, a small Kentucky hospital, agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to five patients who presented to its emergency department. The OIG also alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening and transfer to an individual who presented to the hospital's emergency room in need of dialysis, which the hospital did not have the capability to provide.
04-17-2003
Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, Florida, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide a timely medical screening examination and necessary treatment to a patient who, when she presented in its emergency room, was not ambulatory, had severe stomach pain, was shaking uncontrollably, and was incoherent. The OIG alleged that after repeated requests for help, the hospital refused any timely medical evaluation and refused to call 911 so that the patient could be seen elsewhere. The patient's spouse drove her home and called 911, after which paramedics took her to another hospital where she was immediately admitted for suspected food poisoning and severe dehydration.
04-15-2003
Kaiser Foundation Hospital – Sunset, Los Angeles, California, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Kaiser was a hospital that had specialized capabilities or facilities that refused to accept the transfer from another hospital of an 83-year-old patient needing Kaiser's capabilities for coronary bypass surgery. The OIG alleged that Kaiser's cardiac surgeon refused to accept the transfer saying that the patient was too unstable to transfer and that he was going to die anyway. The patient was transferred to another hospital where he underwent successful surgery and was discharged.
04-07-2003
A Virginia obstetrician agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve his liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute for an incident at Memorial Hospital of Martinsville and Henry County. The OIG alleged that the obstetrician failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment, or an appropriate transfer for a pregnant woman in labor. The OIG further alleged that the obstetrician failed to observe the patient's labor for an adequate period of time and that he failed to take into account the patient's history of genital herpes and precipitous delivery. The OIG alleged that the patient was discharged and sent in a private vehicle to another hospital approximately an hour away and the patient delivered her baby en route in the vehicle.
03-19-2003
Martinsville Newco (f/k/a Memorial Hospital of Martinsville and Henry County) and the Harvest Foundation of the Piedmont (f/k/a Memorial Health System), Virginia, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to a pregnant woman in labor. The OIG further alleged that the hospital failed to take into account the patient's history of genital herpes and precipitous delivery. The patient was allegedly observed for an inadequate period of time prior to being discharged for transfer via a private vehicle to another hospital that was approximately an hour away. The patient delivered her baby en route in the private vehicle.
03-13-2003
Ellwood City Hospital (Ellwood), a small Pennsylvania hospital, agreed to pay $5,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Ellwood failed to provide a 17-year-old pregnant female in labor an appropriate medical screening examination before instructing her to proceed to another hospital 15 miles away, where her doctor had admitting privileges. The patient arrived at the other hospital prior to delivery and the child was safely delivered.
03-10-2003
Sebasticook Valley Hospital, a small hospital in Maine, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute and for alleged cost report fraud. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide a safe transfer of a woman with post-partum active bleeding. While the decision to transfer itself was proper, the OIG alleged that the hospital did not take proper steps to ensure that the transfer was safe. The transfer did not include a trained individual to give IV blood. The patient arrived at the receiving hospital in a state of shock and required three units of blood. Another alleged patient dumping violation involved the hospital allegedly failing to perform an appropriate medical screening examination to determine whether a 19-year old pregnant woman had an emergency medical condition.
03-03-2003
A California surgeon agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve his liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute for an incident at Mercy Medical Center Merced (d/b/a Mercy Hospital and Health Services Merced). The OIG alleged that while on call, the surgeon refused to come to the emergency room to treat a patient with mental disabilities who presented to the hospital suffering severe abdominal distress and shortness of breath. The OIG further alleged that the surgeon made derogatory comments related to the patient's mental condition when he was contacted and asked to come to the emergency room. By the time the on-call surgeon arrived at the facility, after being called at least three times and more than one hour after initially being contacted, the patient had died.
02-10-2003
After it self-disclosed conduct to HHS, Exempla Lutheran Medical Center (Exempla), Colorado, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital refused to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to an individual who presented to its emergency department pursuant to a doctor's orders to rule out appendicitis because the hospital did not accept the individual's insurance (Medicaid). The OIG alleged that an admissions clerk instructed the individual to go to another hospital because Exempla would not accept her Medicaid insurance. The individual drove herself to another hospital that performed a successful appendectomy that night.
02-04-2003
Memorial Hospital of Salem County, Salem, New Jersey, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute to settle allegations that it failed to provide appropriate medical screenings to certain individuals that presented to its emergency department.
01-23-2003
Underwood Memorial Hospital (Underwood), Woodbury, New Jersey, agreed to pay $30,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a man who presented with head injury. The OIG alleged that several hours after the hospital discharged the man, he was unresponsive and was brought to another hospital, which performed an appropriate medical screening, identified an emergency medical condition, and performed necessary surgery.
01-14-2003
Encino-Tarzana Regional Medical Center, Tarzana, California, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide appropriate stabilizing treatment, within its capability, to a patient who presented to its emergency department with a ruptured appendix. The OIG alleged that the hospital denied the appropriate treatment to this individual based on her financial status.

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2002

12-20-2002
Memorial Regional Hospital, Florida, agreed to pay $120,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment, or an appropriate transfer to three individuals who presented to its emergency department with symptoms of a psychiatric emergency which included suicidal thoughts and bizarre behavior. The OIG further alleged that the hospital denied the appropriate treatment to all three individuals based on their financial status.
12-18, 2002
Mercy Medical Center Merced (d/b/a Mercy Hospital and Health Services Merced), located in Merced, California, agreed to pay $7,500 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute for the alleged misconduct of a surgeon. The OIG alleged that the hospital provided, to the best of their ability, an appropriate medical screening examination and treatment to a patient with mental disabilities who presented to the hospital suffering from severe abdominal distress and shortness of breath. The patient, however, allegedly required stabilization that could only be provided by a surgeon. The OIG alleged that while on call, the surgeon refused to come to the emergency room to treat the patient. The OIG further alleged that the surgeon made derogatory comments related to the patient's mental condition when he was contacted and asked to come to the emergency room. By the time the on-call surgeon arrived at the facility, after being called at least three times and more than one hour after initially being contacted, the patient had died.
10-14-2002
Hilton Head Medical Center & Clinics, South Carolina, agreed to pay $17,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a 37-year old pregnant woman in the process of giving birth. Additionally, the hospital allegedly inappropriately transferred the patient to another hospital approximately 38 miles away.
09-30-2002
Fountain Valley Regional Hospital and Medical Center, California, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital delayed its acceptance and treatment of an 18-year-old woman with pregnancy-induced hypertension in order to inquire about her health insurance status.
09-30-2002
Queen of Angels Hollywood-Presbyterian Medical Center, California, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that a 74-year old woman who was brought to the hospital by ambulance in a non-responsive state was not provided a medical screening examination and treatment.
09-23-2002
Baptist Medical Center, Alabama, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a 62-year old man who was brought to the hospital by ambulance.
09-16-2002
Desert Regional Medical Center, California, agreed to pay $26,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that an on-call specialist for the hospital refused to accept an appropriately transferred patient complaining of blunt head trauma.
09-04-2002
Kingman Regional Medical Center, Arizona, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital did not properly screen, treat or transfer six patients as required by patient dumping statute. These patients presented with both physical and psychological complaints.
09-04-2002
Brotman Medical Center, California, agreed to pay $32,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and treatment to a 94-year old woman who was brought to the hospital by ambulance in a non-responsive state.
09-02-2002
Southwestern Medical Center, Oklahoma, agreed to pay $30,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital refused to accept the transfer of a patient in need of the hospital's cardiology services where such services were not available at the transferring hospital.
08-21-2002
Yampa Valley Medical Center, Colorado, agreed to pay $5,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a patient who presented to its emergency room for evaluation and treatment.
08-15-2002
Manatee Memorial Hospital, Florida, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide appropriate medical screening examinations and stabilizing treatment to two patients.
08-08-2002
The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the Department's determination to impose a $35,000 CMP against St. Anthony Hospital, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, for violating the patient dumping statute. The court found that St. Anthony had violated section 1867(g) of the Social Security Act, which requires hospitals with specialized capabilities or facilities to accept appropriate transfers of individuals who require such specialized capabilities or facilities. The Tenth Circuit ruled that St. Anthony Hospital refused to accept an appropriate transfer of a critically injured patient who required its specialized surgical capabilities. St. Anthony refused the transfer because the on-call surgeon refused to come to the hospital to perform the surgery. St. Anthony Hosp. v. United States Dep't of Health and Human Servs., 309 F.3d 680 (10th Cir. 2002)
08-01-2002
Florida Medical Center, Florida, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital refused to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to an individual who presented to its emergency department because the hospital did not accept the individual's insurance.
07-22-2002
John W. Harton Medical Center, Tennessee, paid $30,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to evaluate and treat an 11-day old infant with an unstable emergency medical condition. Despite the availability of an on-call pediatrician, the baby was transferred to another hospital.
06-24-2002
Kendall Medical Center, Florida, agreed to pay $5,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide a pregnant woman an appropriate medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment prior to transferring her to another hospital.
06-22-2002
Dodge County Hospital, a small hospital in Georgia, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide appropriate medical screening examinations to two individuals who presented to the hospital's emergency department.
06-17-2002
Martin County Hospital District, which operates a small Texas hospital, agreed to pay $10,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital refused to treat a patient presenting to its emergency room because he was not a county resident.
06-12-2002
Sac Osage Hospital, a small Missouri hospital, agreed to pay $15,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment or an appropriate transfer to three individuals who presented to its emergency department.
05-31-2002
Baylor Medical Center, Texas, paid $30,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that: (1) a pregnant woman presenting to the emergency department did not receive an appropriate medical screening and was improperly discharged; and (2) the hospital refused to accept the transfer of another patient that needed specialized services available at Baylor because Baylor did not participate in the patient's health plan and the patient did not provide an up-front payment of $5,000.
05-24-2002
Lake Mead Medical Center, a Nevada hospital, paid $64,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that four patients did not receive appropriate medical screening examinations. In one incident, a 10-month old infant was allegedly denied examination and treatment because he did not have insurance and his parents could not pay a cash deposit requested by the hospital. The parents later brought the infant to another emergency room where he was treated for a high fever and respiratory infection.
May 9-2002
A Missouri ophthalmologist paid $10,000 to resolve his liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that while on call, the physician did not come in to the hospital emergency department to evaluate and treat a patient that needed his services.
04-02-2002
University Hospital and Medical Center, Florida, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve allegations that it violated the patient anti-dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the patient did not receive an appropriate medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment, and was inappropriately transferred to another hospital after she had been involved in a motor vehicle accident and sustained damage to her liver.
01-25-2002
El Dorado Hospital, Arizona, agreed to pay $34,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the hospital failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and proper stabilizing treatment to an individual who was brought to the hospital's emergency room with severe stomach and chest pains. The OIG alleged that without obtaining a definitive diagnosis, the hospital discharged the patient to his home in an unstable condition. Early the next morning, the patient was rushed to another hospital where he later died.

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