Skip Navigation Change Font Size

Patient Dumping

In each CMP case resolved through a settlement agreement, the settling party has contested the OIG's allegations and denied any liability. No CMP judgment or finding of liability has been made against the settling party.

2014

06-06-2014
Trinity Medical Center d/b/a Trinity Bettendorf (Trinity), Iowa, agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. OIG alleged that Trinity failed to provide appropriate screening or stabilizing treatment for an individual who came to Trinity's emergency department with emergency medical and psychiatric conditions.
06-05-2014 OIG Enforcement Case
Indiana Hospital Settles EMTALA Case Involving Allegations of Patient Dumping
Effective June 5, 2014, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services entered into a settlement agreement with St. Vincent Jennings Hospital (SVJH). SVJH agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve its liability for civil monetary penalties under the patient dumping statute. Specifically, OIG alleged that SVJH violated the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) by failing to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a patient who arrived via ambulance to SVJH's emergency department with an emergency medical condition. OIG was represented in this matter by Associate Counsel Patrick Garcia and Eula Taylor.
06-05-2014 OIG Enforcement Case
California Hospital Settles EMTALA Case Involving Patient Dumping Allegations
Olive View - UCLA Medical Center - a county hospital in Sylmar, CA - entered into a settlement agreement with the Office of Inspector General (OIG) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, effective May 23, 2014. The $40,750 settlement resolves allegations that Olive View violated the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act, (EMTALA), by failing to provide an individual with an appropriate medical screening examination (MSE) within the capability of the hospital's emergency department in order to determine whether he had an emergency medical condition.

Specifically, the individual presented to the Olive View emergency department with signs of appendicitis and severe abdominal pain that he rated at a 10 on a 10-point scale. Despite his severe pain and symptoms, he was forced to wait for several hours to receive an MSE. After waiting for 6.5 hours, he left to seek medical screening and treatment at another hospital, where he was diagnosed with acute appendicitis with a large peritoneal abscess and had to undergo an immediate laparoscopic appendectomy. According to EMTALA, if an individual comes to a hospital emergency department and a request is made on his/her behalf for examination or treatment for a medical condition, the hospital must provide for an appropriate MSE within the capability of the emergency department to determine whether or not an emergency medical condition exists. OIG was represented by Associate Counsel Odies Williams, IV. Olive View was represented by Brandi M. Moore of the Los Angeles County Counsel's Office.
05-15-2014 OIG Enforcement Case
Mercy Hospital in Miami, FL Settles EMTALA Case
Mercy Hospital - a campus of Plantation General Hospital in Miami, FL - agreed to pay $45,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide appropriate medical screening for a 24-day-old baby brought to the hospital's Emergency Department for an emergency medical condition, including persistent low body temperature. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services alleged that Mercy Hospital violated the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) by failing to provide adequate evaluation and treatment because it did not address the newborn's low temperature nor did it order any further laboratory tests, such as a blood count, blood chemistry lab, or urinalysis, before telling the parents to take the baby home. Minutes after leaving the hospital, the baby suffered cardiac arrest, kidney injury and potential injury to the brain from lack of oxygen because of an issue with the bowel, known as necrotic bowel. OIG contends that EMTALA is intended to protect vulnerable patients such as newborn babies who cannot articulate their own needs, and medical professionals must consider appropriate diagnostic techniques and adequately listen to family members presenting the baby's chief symptoms.
04-15-2014
Gregory Bohn, M.D., Iowa, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve his liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. OIG alleged that Dr. Bohn, the on-call surgeon at Trinity Bettendorf, refused to examine or treat a patient who had an emergency medical condition that required surgery.
02-07-2014
Claiborne County Medical Center (CCMC), Mississippi, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. OIG alleged that CCMC failed to provide an adequate medical screening examination to a patient who presented to its emergency department.

2013

12-04-2013
Carolinas Medical Center (Carolinas), North Carolina, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. OIG alleged that Carolinas failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment to a patient that needed psychiatric treatment.
10-18-2013
Regional Medical Center at Memphis (RMC), Tennessee, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that RMC failed to provide a medical screening examination to a patient who was refused access to the emergency department and told to go instead to a nearby hospital.
09-03-2013
Northeast Georgia Medical Center (Northeast), Georgia, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Northeast refused to accept an appropriate transfer of a patient who required Northeast's specialized capabilities.
08-15-2013
The Finley Hospital (Finley), Iowa, agreed to pay $30,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Finley violated the requirements of the patient dumping statute when it delayed the provision of stabilizing treatment to a patient when it transferred him to another facility based in part upon his status as an IowaCare patient.
08-07-2013
St. Luke's Hospital (St. Luke's), Iowa, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that St. Luke's violated the requirements of the patient dumping statute when it failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination by transferring the patient to another facility based in part upon his status as an IowaCare patient.
07-24-2013
Mahaska Health Partnership (Mahaska), Iowa, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Mahaska failed to provide appropriate medical screening, stabilizing treatment, or an appropriate transfer for an individual who presented to Mahaska with a serious emergency medical condition.
07-15-2013
East Texas Medical Center Carthage (ETMC Carthage), Texas, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that ETMC Carthage violated the requirements of the patient dumping statute when it failed to provide an adequate medical screening examination to a patient who was 24 weeks pregnant. The patient presented to ETMC Carthage with complaints of uterine contractions and abdominal pain. The patient was told to seek care in Henderson Texas because ETMC Carthage did not have obstetrical (OB) service and did not have an OB doctor on staff. The patient then left ETMC Carthage by private vehicle.
07-01-2013
Mercy Hospital of Franciscan Sisters (Mercy), Iowa, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Mercy violated the requirements of the patient dumping statute when it failed to provide an adequate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment, or an appropriate transfer for a patient who presented to Mercy's emergency department after ingesting window de-icer, a product containing the toxin methanol.
04-26-2013
Emory University Hospital (Emory), Georgia, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Emory refused to accept appropriate transfer of a patient who required Emory's specialized capabilities.
04-04-2013
Donalsonville Hospital, Inc. (Donalsonville), Georgia, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Donalsonville failed to provide an adequate medical screening examination to a patient who presented to their emergency department complaining of shortness of breath and chest pain. The patient did not receive any medical examination from a physician and was told he was required to pay a minimum fee of $100 to continue further treatment. The patient chose not to pay the fee and was discharged without receiving an appropriate medical screening examination. The delay in the provision of an appropriate medical screening examination and the imposition of a minimum fee to receive an appropriate medical screening examination were inappropriate.
02-22-2013
Sacred Heart Hospital (SHH), IL, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that SHH failed to provide a medical screening examination for a 63-year old woman who presented to the emergency department and was not breathing. SHH provided no screening and called the Chicago Fire Department who transferred her to another hospital where she was pronounced dead.
01-28-2013
Holmes Regional Medical Center (HRMC), FL, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that HRMC failed to provide a medical screening examination and to adequately stabilize a 30-year old pregnant woman who presented to their emergency department experiencing chest pains, in potential cardiac arrest, and became unresponsive. Both the patient and her baby died.

2012

11-13-2012
University of Chicago Medical Center (UCMC), IL, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that UCMC failed to provide appropriate medical screening and stabilizing treatment within its capabilities to a male patient who presented to their emergency department complaining of severe jaw pain as a result of a physical assault. The results of a CT scan taken by UCMC revealed injuries that needed corrective surgery. UCMC did not provide further treatment and discharged the patient with instructions to go to another hospital for further care.
10-19-2012
Hackley Hospital (Hackley), Michigan, agreed to pay $90,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Hackley failed to provide stabilizing treatment within its capabilities to a woman in labor and her unborn child prior to transferring her to another hospital for treatment.
10-09-2012
Southcoast Hospital Group (Southcoast), Massachusetts, agreed to pay $45,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Southcoast failed to provide stabilizing treatment prior to transferring a patient that presented to its emergency department experiencing labored breathing.
09-05-2012
Duke University Health System d/b/a Duke University Hospital (Duke), North Carolina, agreed to pay $180,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Duke failed to accept five appropriate transfers of individuals with unstable psychiatric emergency medical conditions.
06-15-2012
Hendricks Community Hospital (Hendricks), Minnesota, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Hendricks failed to provide a medical screening examination and stabilization treatment to a patient that presented to its emergency department. The patient previously had surgery at another hospital and was in serious pain, could not urinate, and needed a catheter placement. An emergency department physician instructed hospital staff to tell the patient he would need to seek treatment at the hospital where his surgery was performed. Hendricks provided no screening or treatment for the patient, even though the patient's pain level was such that it was difficult for him to ambulate.
05-31-2012
Texas County Memorial Hospital (TCMH), Texas, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that TCMH failed to provide an adequate medical screening examination for a minor. Specifically, the minor presented to TCMH's emergency department (ED) and was accompanied by a family member. TCMH's registration clerk informed the family member that the minor should be treated by her family physician rather than be admitted to TCMH's ED. The minor left TCMH without receiving a medical screen.
03-07-2012
Northside Hospital (Northside), Florida, agreed to pay $38,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Northside failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to a patient with a history of mitral valve replacement. Specifically, the patient presented to Northside's emergency department (ED) by ambulance with flu symptoms and a high fever. A triage nurse instructed the patient to go home and to follow his primary care physician's orders. Two days later the patient presented again to Northside's ED and was admitted to their intensive care unit. On August 8, 2009, the patient died due to influenza A (H1N1).
02-10-2012
Fort Lauderdale Hospital, Inc. (FLH), Florida, agreed to pay $45,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that FLH failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to an autistic patient that presented to FLH's emergency department after physically attacking his mother. A clinical psychologist asked for the patient's insurance information. FLH did not accept the patient's insurance and the patient's mother was instructed to take the patient to another facility. The patient was seen at another facility and admitted for six days due to a diagnosis of depression.

2011

12-22-2011
Princeton Baptist Medical Center (PBMC), Alabama, agreed to pay $170,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that PBMC failed to provide care, within its capabilities, to four individuals who were suffering from emergency medical conditions. Three of the individuals presented to PBMC's emergency department with intracranial hemorrhages and one of the individuals presented with multiple fractures of the spinal column.
12-20-2011
Matthew Pearson, M.D., Tennessee, agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Dr. Pearson, while on call at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (Vanderbilt), refused to accept an appropriate transfer of an individual with an unstable emergency medical condition who required the specialized capabilities that were available at Vanderbilt. The patient was transferred to another facility and died shortly thereafter.
12-20-2011
Vanderbilt University Medical Center (Vanderbilt), Tennessee, agreed to pay $45,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Vanderbilt refused to accept an appropriate transfer of an individual with an unstable emergency medical condition who required the specialized capabilities that were available at Vanderbilt. The patient was transferred to another facility and died shortly thereafter.
11-15-2011
Schoolcraft Memorial Hospital (SMH), Michigan, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that SMH failed to provide stabilizing treatment to a 15-year-old male who came to SMH's emergency department (ED) for examination and treatment of psychiatric and medical emergencies. The patient presented to SMH's ED after a suicide attempt. The medical screening examination revealed that the patient was suffering from hypotension and abnormal heart rhythm. SMH provided the patient with a psychological assessment and intravenous fluids but did not provide further medical treatment needed to stabilize the patient's medical condition. SMH transferred the patient to a psychiatric facility 169 miles away without stabilizing the patient's vital signs. Forty minutes into the transfer, the patient began experiencing hypotensive episodes.
10-04-2011
Piedmont Hospital (Piedmont), Georgia, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Piedmont failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to a patient that presented with an emergency medical condition. Specifically, the patient presented to Piedmont after being diagnosed with a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) by her private physician. The patient made repeated requests for treatment for eight hours without success. The patient left Piedmont and presented to another hospital where she was diagnosed and treated for a pulmonary embolus in addition to the DVT.
10-03-2011
Springhill Medical Center (SMC), Alabama, agreed to pay $45,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that SMC failed to accept an appropriate transfer of a patient with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient was accepted by another hospital approximately 100 miles away and expired the next day.
08-31-2011
Beatrice Community Hospital and Health Center (Beatrice), Nebraska, agreed to pay $30,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Beatrice failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to two patients that presented with emergency medical conditions. Specifically, a patient presented to Beatrice complaining of discomfort after removing a feeding tube. The patient was not appropriately screened or stabilized before discharge. Another patient presented complaining of a loss of consciousness and difficulty moving his extremities after falling and hitting his head. The patient was not appropriately screened or stabilized before discharge. The patient later received treatment at another hospital but died as a result of his injury.
08-29-2011
Jewish Hospital & St. Mary's HealthCare (Jewish Hospital), Kentucky, agreed to pay $42,500 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Jewish Hospital failed to provide a medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment to a patient that presented to two of its emergency departments (ED). The patient was suffering from a wrist laceration with arterial bleeding. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) transported the patient to two of Jewish Hospital's ED's that are located on the same property. Both ED's instructed the EMS to transport the patient to another hospital.
08-17-2011
Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (Santa Clara), California, agreed to pay $48,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Santa Clara failed to provide a medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment to a patient that presented to its emergency department (ED) after receiving a referral from a nearby urgent care facility which diagnosed him with severe abnormal hemoglobin results. It was suspected that the patient had some sort of internal bleeding. Upon arrival to Santa Clara's ED, the patient showed a nurse the referral papers and complained of dizziness, blurred vision, and fatigue. The patient was categorized as non-emergent and waited in the waiting room for seven hours. The patient expired in the ED.
07-08-2011
Dallas County Hospital District d/b/a Parkland Health and Hospital System (Parkland), California, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Parkland failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination to a patient that presented with an emergency medical condition. Specifically, Parkland failed to provide a physician ordered EKG or intravenous monitoring to a 58-year old cardiac diabetic patient. The patient expired of a heart attack.

2010

12-23-2010
North Fulton Hospital (North Fulton), Georgia, agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that North Fulton failed to provide a medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment to a patient that presented to its emergency department (ED). The patient was 30 weeks pregnant and reported with complaints of labor pain to North Fulton's ED upon the advice of her physician.
11-22-2010
Mobile Infirmary (MI), Alabama, agreed to pay $45,000 to resolve its liability for civil monetary penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that MI refused to accept an appropriate transfer to its hospital of a patient in need of specialized capabilities available at MI. The refusal of the transfer request delayed care and treatment for a patient's gastrointestinal bleed. Two hours after the request to MI, the patient was finally transferred to another hospital approximately 60 miles away. En route, the patient's condition deteriorated and the patient had to be transported by helicopter to the receiving hospital. The patient subsequently died that day.
11-16-2010
Houston Northwest Medical Center (HNMC), Texas, agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that HNMC failed to provide appropriate medical screening or stabilizing treatment for a pregnant female who came to HNMC's emergency department while having labor contractions.
11-04-2010
November 4, 2010 - Port St. Lucie Hospital (PSLH), Florida, agreed to pay $19,000 to resolve its liability for civil monetary penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that PSLH refused to accept an appropriate transfer to its hospital of a patient in need of specialized capabilities available at PSLH. Specifically, the OIG alleged that PSLH refused to accept the patient based on an erroneous belief that the patient was uninsured. A second transfer request transfer was made the next day and the same nurse at PSLH again denied transfer.
09-07-2010
Providence Hospital, Alabama, agreed to pay $45,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Providence refused to accept an appropriate transfer to its hospital of a patient in need of specialized capabilities available at Providence. The patient's condition deteriorated and, as a result, the patient was transported by helicopter to another hospital and died that day.
06-14-2010
University of Chicago Medical Center (UCMC), Illinois, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that UCMC failed to provide a medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment to a patient that presented to its emergency department (ED). The liability stems from UCMC failing to log the patient into their system after he presented via ambulance. The patient was left in the waiting area. Approximately three hours later, the patient's daughter approached the triage desk and informed the ED staff that her father still had not been seen. The triage nurse approached the patient and saw that he was non-responsive and had rigor mortis. The ED physician, upon examining the patient, pronounced him dead.
04-27-2010
Olive View UCLA Medical Center (Olive View), California, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve its liability for Civil Monetary Penalties under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that Olive View's emergency department (ED) did not provide an appropriate medical screening examination (MSE) or stabilizing treatment to a patient that presented to its ED. The liability stems from a 33-year-old patient who presented to Olive View's ED complaining of chest pains. After waiting for over three hours without receiving a MSE, the patient exited the ED, collapsed outside of the building, and despite attempts to resuscitate him, was pronounced dead within minutes.

2009

09-29-2009
Kaiser Foundation Hospitals - Santa Clara (Kaiser), California, agreed to pay $100,000 for allegedly violating the Patient Anti-Dumping Statute on two separate occasions. On both occasions, Kaiser failed to provide appropriate medical screening examinations and stabilizing treatment. On the first occasion, a 15-year old presented to Kaiser's emergency department (ED) doubled over, crying and complaining of severe abdominal pain. Kaiser discharged the patient and sent her to a pediatric physician group on the hospital's campus. On the second occasion, a 12-year old boy returned to Kaiser's ED after being sent home the night before. He presented with a high fever, continued pain and was lethargic with swollen eyes and face. He was also discharged to the pediatric physician group on the hospital's campus. Over six hours after he presented to the ED, he was admitted to Kaiser's Pediatric Intensive Care Unit where he died the next morning from staphylococcal sepsis.
09-10-2009
Robert Wood John University Hospital Hamilton (RWJ Hamilton), New Jersey, agreed to pay $65,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that RWJ Hamilton failed to provide a medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment or an appropriate transfer for a mother and her newborn child who came to RWJ Hamilton's emergency department for examination and treatment for a medical condition.
06-04-2009
Palms West Hospital (PWH), Florida, agreed to pay $50,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that on two separate occasions, PWH refused to accept an appropriate transfer to its hospital of a patient in need of specialized capabilities available at Palms.
06-02-2009
Plantation General Hospital (PGH), Florida, agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The settlement resolved allegations that PGH failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination, stabilizing treatment, and/or an appropriate transfer for a pregnant patient that presented to its emergency department in active labor. A friend drove the patient at very high speeds to another hospital where she delivered her baby minutes after arrival.
03-06-2009
Research Medical Center (RMC), Missouri, agreed to pay $40,000 to resolve its liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The settlement resolved allegations that RMC failed to appropriately screen and stabilize a patient who presented with severe abdominal pain resulting from an ectopic pregnancy.
02-25-2009
An Illinois physician agreed to pay $35,000 to resolve his liability for CMPs under the patient dumping statute. The OIG alleged that the on-call physician failed to respond to a request to come to the emergency department to treat a patient that presented with an open leg fracture. The patient was transferred to another facility and underwent emergency surgery.
02-17-2009
Stanly Memorial Hospital n/k/a Stanly Regional Medical Center (Stanly), North Carolina, agreed to pay $20,000 for allegedly violating the Patient Anti-Dumping Statute on two separate occasions: (1) Stanly failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment prior to transferring a patient that presented with symptoms of alcohol and polysubstance abuse and depression; and (2) Stanly failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination or stabilizing treatment prior to discharging a patient that presented with symptoms of drug abuse.

2008

09-02-2008
St. Francis Medical Center (St. Francis), Missouri, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve its liability under section 1867 of the Social Security Act (Act), 42 U.S.C. section 1395dd, the Patient Anti-Dumping Statute. The settlement resolved allegations that St. Francis failed to provide stabilizing treatment to a patient, prior to discharging her, that presented to its emergency department requesting dialysis and complaining of diarrhea and nausea and vomiting for four days, shortness of breath, and chest pains.
08-04-2008
Baptist Hospital, Inc. (Baptist), Florida, agreed to pay $22,500 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to a man that presented to Baptist's emergency department (ED) via ambulance. The OIG alleged that an EMT informed Baptist that the man had not taken his psychiatric medication, was suicidal, and claimed to hear voices. Baptist failed to perform a medical screening examination of the patient and he was left unsupervised in the triage area. The patient complained to the registrar that his suicidal thoughts were growing stronger, but the registrar told him that he would have to continue to wait. After waiting for approximately 45 minutes, the patient left the hospital and walked to an adjacent parking lot and lacerated his right arm. The patient was taken by ambulance back to Baptist and admitted for 16 days of psychiatric treatment.
06-30-2008
Cumberland County Hospital System, Inc. d/b/a Cape Fear Valley Medical Center (Cape Fear), North Carolina, agreed to pay $42,500 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to a 13 year-old mentally ill girl who threatened to kill herself. The patient was allegedly seen by a physician for approximately 5 minutes before she was released. Less than 50 minutes after the physician saw the patient, the patient jumped out of a car traveling approximately 40 miles per hour and fractured her skull.
06-25-2008
Rogers Memorial Hospital, Wisconsin, agreed to pay $30,000 to resolve allegations that it failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination and stabilizing treatment to a 57 year-old woman that presented to the hospital's emergency department with her family. The woman had a history of depression. The OIG alleged that the hospital informed the patient and her family that they did not accept Medicaid patients in her age group. The patient was transported by her family to another hospital where she was admitted for depression and suicidal ideations.
05-07-2008
Ephraim McDowell Regional Medical Center (EMRMC), Kentucky, agreed to pay $25,000 to resolve allegations that its emergency department physician redirected an ambulance arriving on hospital property with a woman with elevated blood sugar and a decreased level of consciousness without first providing an adequate medical screening examination to the woman.
03-14-2008
Denver Health Medical Center (Denver Health), Colorado, agreed to pay $20,000 to resolve allegations that it refused to accept an appropriate transfer of an individual who required Denver Health's specialized Level I trauma capabilities after an automobile accident.
03-06-2008
Tomball Regional Hospital (TRH), Texas, agreed to pay $32,500 to resolve allegations that it violated the screening and stabilization provisions of the Patient Anti-Dumping Statute. The OIG alleged that TRH failed to provide proper screening and stabilization to a patient who presented to its emergency department in a combative state and on narcotics. The patient had a psychiatric history of attention deficit disorder. The ED physician did not request a psychiatric consultation with the on-call psychiatrist. Instead, the patient was discharged with a final diagnosis of drug intake. Approximately an hour later, the patient arrived at another hospital accompanied by the police. The patient was admitted and diagnosed with having a bipolar disorder.
03-03-2008
Orlando Regional Healthcare Systems, Inc. (ORHS), Florida, agreed to pay $85,000 for allegedly violating the Patient Anti-Dumping Statute on three separate occasions: (1) ORHS inappropriately transferred a 27-year old female in active labor; (2) ORHS did not accept a patient referred to one of its facilities under the Baker Act; and (3) ORHS failed to provide an appropriate medical screening examination for a patient who arrived at its emergency department.

Top

Return to Civil Monetary Penalties

Return to Enforcement Actions

Office of Inspector General, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services | 330 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20201